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Justin M. White Posts

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 8-30-2017

It has been one heck of a week.

Jump to:

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Copyright Corner

Emerging Technobabble

Research Reports

Get your professional development on!

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Following the events in Charlottesville, there’s a lot to talk about:

After Charlottesville, more campuses brace for neo-Nazi and alt-right protests. Which also leads into a discussion on how white supremacists have become the face of free speech debates on campus. The right to advocate for the extermination of groups of people is still a high priority for public universities (apparently “incitement” is no longer an issue).

The SPLC has created a “What Students Need to Know” guide about the alt-right. There is also the Charlottesville syllabus.

R. David Lankes’s piece “On Racism, Ignorance, and Librarianship.” I disagree with the way Lankes uses  the term “political party”, as if the struggles of people targeted by white supremacy are not politics-proper, but some sort of special interest. White supremacists have clearly chosen their favored party, and anti-fascists have realized when those ties have been cause for protest. However, despite finding this type of liberal non-racism distasteful, I am glad that Lankes did use his platform to reinforce the fact that librarians are not neutral. I would simply add that as librarians, as human beings, and for me and Lankes, as white people, we have a commitment to anti-racism, which will inevitably require the use of party politics, ideology, economics, public policy, and other areas that white people tend to claim as the neutral territory that their particular problems inhabit.

Copyright Corner

Songwriters push for the inclusion of authors’ moral rights into US copyright law. Because it has worked out so well in the few places we already have it (VARA).

Speaking of a troubling combination of moral rights, statues, and VARA, guess how copyright is getting in on the Confederate statue debate?

An education law pushes copyright enforcement as part of the responsibilities of teachers. I have a suggestion for an awareness program in the comments.

Farmers are hackers (pharmers?). I can’t wait for the dystopian movie with the 80s soundtrack.

Will the AI overthrow of humanity come down to intellectual property rights?

Emerging Technobabble

AT&T loses its attempt to enforce its state-backed monopoly against Google Fiber development in Louisville. Don’t worry AT&T, you still have your hands in the pockets of most state legislatures.

Research Reports

Article: What do data librarians think of their MLIS education?

Get your professional development on!

Article: Social media as a cost-effective way to promote library services.

 

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 8-13-2017

Another fascinating week!

Jump to:
Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)
Scholarly (Mis)Communication
Copyright Corner
Emerging Technobabble
Research Reports
Get your professional development on!

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Advocating as a librarian isn’t easy or simple. Here’s a little advice.

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Two studies suggest there’s trouble ahead for academic publishing (this link summarizes a lot of the issues also mentioned here, so a good place to start if you’re short on time!).

Elsevier acquires bepress, attempting to create an all-in-one scholarly ecosystem that it can provide to research institutions.

And still the system staggers on, broken and hypocritical.

Still, at least the Resistance is still going strong, with Sci-Hub having nearly all academic reserach within its grasp (and no signs of slowing).

Copyright Corner

Here’s some hopeful writing on OA tools, but don’t expect too much. See the emerging technologies section below for more on OA tools, there are some really good ones coming of age!

Cooking and copyright reform. A culinary gathering at “USQ Springfield and USQ Ipswich to celebrate the success of the Cooking for Copyright campaign, which led to national copyright reforms.”

Emerging Technobabble

What role does research provide in EdTech decision-making? (Hint: it’s not as rational as we would hope).

The Internet Archive is partnering with public libraries to decentralize the net and promote Web archiving!

As promised, here’s a slideshow that came into my Google Scholar alerts that has a lot of new OA tools I’ve never heard of, but are very exciting!

Research Reports

What gets kids to enjoy reading?

What’s the deal with Problem-Based Learning, and should we be so quick to employ it?

Get your professional development on!

CFP for articles on new literacies.

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 7-30-2017

It’s been a while since my last post, with a lot going on at work and such. But there’s always more to talk about, so let’s get going!

Jump to:
Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Copyright Corner

Emerging Technobabble

Research Reports

Get your professional development on!

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

A little late on the reporting, but the House Appropriation Committee was very miffed about the House Judiciary Committee stealing their thunder with the Copyright Office “reform” bill.

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Paper: “Pressing Forward in Scholarly Communities:Synthesizing Communication Technologies with the Researchers Who Utilize Them”
Does Open Access work for circumventing paywalls? What will the crossover period look like? Will OA keep growing?
More on scholarly communication below.

Copyright Corner

More on Sci-Hub and Elsevier’s lawsuit against it.
Also, how exactly does Sci-Hub do what it does? Have publishers been hacked?
Also a very interesting discussion at a Scholarly Communication conference on Sci-hub and other academic piracy as a symptom.
The W3C and the Encrypted Media Extensions (DRM extensions) HTML standard: EFF’s response highlights librarian voices (an encouraging trend and a good argument for librarians to accept their role in this conversation).

Emerging Technobabble

Surprisingly, for a satire paper, Forbes has a thoughtful take on the need for web preservation.
Has the joy of learning gone out of online education?

Research Reports

Paper: Avoiding information overload.

Get your professional development on!

My colleague also finished her webinar on gamification for the South Carolina Library Association, so please do check out the recording!

Upcoming Webinar on Copyright, 6-21 at 2pm Eastern.

June 21, 2017 Emerging Issues in Copyright: A Jaunt Through Some Common Problems 2:00-3:00pm EST Justin M. White

Hodges University

Register for webinar here This webinar will take a stroll through some issues in copyright that show there is a serious need to rethink how we conceptualize copyright, authors’ rights, and fair use. There are no easy solutions, but it’s important to understand the questions. Issues will include: remixing, reusing, fair use, piracy, non-legal rule-making (from digital content platforms), encryption and copying, and the economic and cultural effects of near-costless copying. It will touch on how various economies intersect, such as the prestige economy of academic publishing vs. the economics of plenty. Obscure journals no longer need Elsevier to stay afloat, they only need institutional support, a website, and a good sitemap that can be indexed by Google. Optionally, these journals can also publish in platforms like Scholar Commons (bepress), and again have their metadata immediately indexed by Google Scholar. Open Educational Resources and the textbook industry will come up, along with the non-academic topics of artistic creation in platforms that are constantly policed by our copyright laws. The primary purpose of the webinar will be to give librarians some food for thought: a few cautionary tales from the world of copyright, and perhaps a few ideas to act upon. Recommended for anyone who enjoyed the book The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future (2016).

You can find more webinars and a call for webinar presenters here: http://www.nclaonline.org/college-university 

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 6-4-2017

I was hoping on doing one a week, but yet again I’m on a bi-weekly schedule.

Again, I have to thank Audrey Watters of Hack Education for the inspiration of this blogging format, with her weekly wrap up of education technology news.

Jump to:
Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Copyright Corner

Datafication Station

Emerging Technobabble

Research Reports

Get your professional development on!

New Sources

Ending on a Good Note

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Rhetoric and the cold war politics of information science. Nuff said. It’s behind a paywall in ASIS&T and doesn’t seem to have an OA version archived. I’m an ASIS&T member. Dunno why I mention that. Also the contact form is to the right. Dunno why I mention that either.

The Association of American Publishers is being reasonable, apparently. Good for them! So proud. *Trips over the bar that has been set for them*

I made it this far without mentioning the FCC, but… “People who were impersonated by anti-net neutrality spammers blast FCC”.

Podcast fans! The future of Internet copyright is among us! Rejoyce!

My favorite satirical magazine came up with yet another gem: To Reduce Terrorism, Repeal Network Neutrality. Seriously, I don’t know how they can parody clueless assholes so well.

Interesting development out of the 11th circuit: obtain a copyright registration before initiating litigation.

Also, calls on the Continent for the European Parliament to make progressive copyright changes. Will Europe become the copyright leader after being the force for more restrictions?

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Sigh. Just…. sigh. I’m not going to get myself worked up.

Open Peer Review! It’s a thing!

Copyright Corner

Apparently still unaware of the existence of the Streisand Effect, copyright monopolist Elsevier is taking Sci-Hub and LibGen to court again. Though they won the takedown of the Sci-Hub domain two years ago, the site persevered and remained open. This time, Elbakyan (the creator of Sci-Hub) notes that any attempt to shut down the domain will ultimately be futile, since it also resides on a TOR onion site.

Does Fair Use Affect Academic Authors’ Incentive to Write? I’ll give you a hint.

Ever wonder what a Copyright Librarian actually does? It’s pretty important!

This very thoughtful piece on UConn’s decision to not renew its Adobe CC license, and what this means for the values of the university, the students, and one professor’s attempts to navigate the realm of copyright in conversations with their students and peers.

On the arts and copyright, a Japanese music collection society wants private schools to pay up (lousy greedy kids).

Datafication Station

Algorithmic governance. I for one…. you know the joke.

Emerging Technobabble

AI and newsrooms. What could go wrong.

I think someone at the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies had an existential crisis: Don’t worry about opaque algorithms; you already don’t know what anything is doing, or why.

What kind of of Information Literacy are we teaching anyway?

Research Reports

I’ve been thinking about:

Scholarly communication in a non-academic sense. Even for librarians.

Open Access, Linked Open Data, and library collections. Also link rot and data protection.

Adult learners and information/search literacy using real-life examples. Also the new ACRL report on how librarians contribute to student success.

I’ve got a copyright webinar I’m giving, and The End of Ownership was useful in thinking of how to connect some dots for the listener.

And of course, cool tools that help organize the chaos of my life.

Get your professional development on!

Webinar: Empower students as creators

Webinar: Move into library middle management

New Sources

The Humanities Commons.

Humanities Commons is a trusted, nonprofit network where humanities scholars can create a professional profile, discuss common interests, develop new publications, and share their work. The Humanities Commons network is open to anyone.

Open Source Survey

Ending on a Good Note

Today we get to end on a really good note: Diego Gomez has been cleared of criminal charges for the heinous crime of sharing a master’s thesis.

 

Collier County FL and the new battles over textbooks

The Florida Citizens for Science have been doing a great job tracking this legislative battle:

Fresh off their success in the Florida legislature where their instructional materials bill passed, the Florida Citizens’ Alliance is now causing migraine headaches on their home turf: Group sues Collier County schools over textbook selection

The session concerning public objections to the textbooks up for approval by the school board was archived here: http://www.collierschools.com/site/Default.aspx?PageID=10655

The News-Press reports that five books were approved and one was rejected. 

Here’s a preview of the kinds of objections raised:

Joseph Doyle, a Collier County resident who doesn’t have children in the school system, agreed with the parental objections and said one of the books, “Understanding Economics,” “bent to socialism and social justice warriors trying to indoctrinate our children.”

You can find the list of objections here: http://floridacitizensalliance.com/liberty/instructional-materials-review-index/

This is just the first in a series of fights that will take place in school districts all across Florida due to the passage of HB 989.

It’s also important to note that another law was passed that isn’t often mentioned, a “religious freedom” bill that will be used in tandem with the instructional materials bill to challenge science and history in the classroom. This is the  explicit position of the Florida Citizen’s Alliance on the bills:

Flaugh said his group will use it in conjunction with the instructional materials bill to contest textbooks that demonstrate “bias toward Islam and seldom mention Christianity,” and promote those that push for a Christian view of the origins of life.

The Florida Citizens’ Alliance seem to be taking cues from the fight in Texas over textbooks, citing Texas Truth in Textbooks in their website.

Librarians will need to be ready and willing to provide supplemental materials for teachers that can support curriculum goals when books have been challenged and removed, but classes will be expected to go on. EDIT: I have also been informed that the bill allows all instructional materials to be challenged, including supplemental materials that librarians might help curate.

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 5-21-2017

I’ve decided to go to a bi-weekly schedule to keep from putting too much pressure on myself.

Again, I have to thank Audrey Watters of Hack Education for the inspiration of this blogging format, with her weekly wrap up of education technology news.

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Speaking of interesting ad campaigns, Freedom of the Press Foundation did a targeted ad campaign of their SecureDrop system to potential whistleblowers in the Trump Administration.

Publishers Weekly has joined the list of people who noticed that librarianship is political. At least this time HR 1695 makes an appearance.

Librarians are starting to finally pay attention to HR 1695.

The FCC is in a pensive mood, as a rush of comments about Net Neutrality led it to take down its comments so it can “reflect”.

A dire lack of library access in schools was trending news in Scotland. A defense of public libraries in Northern Ireland also blipped on my radar. I’m not as familiar with the state of librarianship in the UK, but it’s something I would love to hear more about in the comments.

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Lots here on science publishing. Jon Tennant of Green Tea and Velociraptors gets two features: a guide for researchers looking to get started at ScienceOpen, and another on why we don’t need journal blacklists (particularly ones we have to pay for from publishers, for obvious reasons).

“Steady, strong growth” of OA in the sciences is expected, but so is their relationship to the traditional publishing model. What’s up with that?

But that’s not stopping Nature from profiting from shoddy science (and the retraction papers). Maybe we need to be focusing more on Open Peer Review, as well as Open Access.

“Do ResearchGate Scores create ghost academic reputations?” Social mediafication of academic reputations?! You mean academics are sometimes rated on their popularity, or other inflated prestige indicators, not the sheer quality of their research? Color me shocked.

Copyright Corner

One of the scant updates on Diego Gomez I’ve been able to find, the grad student who is facing jail time for sharing a MA thesis in Colombia. The reason this barbaric level of punishment exists? Why, it’s just the American way. And we’re not going to stop helping other countries create these laws any time soon.

Not only is it possible to copyright the law now, it’s apparently also not fair use to use footage of government proceedings. In cases like this, context is often key.

Whatever happened to digital first sale cases anyway?

Patent troll Blackbird “Tech” (apparently an abstract term representing the idea of technology, not the actual production of it) gets an earful after filing a lawsuit against Cloudflare.

Datafication Station

There was a fascinating speech put out on “The Quantified Worker,” by Ifeoma Ajunwa, and the move away from Taylorism and towards a mastery of the body of the worker: like Wellness Programs creating healthy workers that increase productivity. Similarly, what does the datafication of everything mean for justice and society? As librarians, we are often information scientists, and migrate into a data scientist role. Unlike data scientists, we have a longer tradition of emphasizing the “soft” skills and rights of users, and we should make sure to be heard in that discussion (I have an upcoming chapter on this I’ll link to once the publishing agreement is finished).

That is, if you still have a job.

Emerging Technobabble

Ex Libris is pushing its products towards BIBFRAME. Just as the LoC is upping its efforts. Maybe it’ll be in production by the time other linked-data initiatives steal all the thunder, like Wikipedia and the Wikipedia Library.

Disruption is a term I’m already getting sick of, as it’s almost never about the technology itself.

Personal digital archiving is something I think about often. I wonder what digital archives will look like in 50 years.

Research Reports

I’ve added a neat feature from the Internet Archive I wasn’t aware of, which is a 404 page handler that will attempt to send a person to the archived version of the page they were looking for. Hope some of my site breaks so I can try it out!

I also presented at the Florida Library Association’s annual conference last week, and the Technical Services Member Group’s website now has our slides.

I’m playing around with using Facebook to promote scholarly websites. I don’t know how many people expect to see an Open Access Resources list as a sponsored ad on Facebook, but hopefully they’ll like it.

Get your professional development on!

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/philosophy-of-technology (Starts May 29)

And the Technical Services Member Group also updated our list of training resources on demand.

New Sources

The LoC released 25 million MARC records to the public.

Ending on a Good Note

Although this is ending on a good note, it should also be a section on “how to bury the lede”. Here’s the good note:

LaVaille Reifenrath has also decided to do an independent campaign to raise money for the library. As an independent project and fundraiser, the library director will make a special journey in her wheelchair to raise money for the Emerson Public Library.

“I chose on my 50th birthday, June 11th, to wheel from here to Dakota City and to collect money to do some updates to the library,” said LaVaille Reifenrath, Director, Emerson Public Library.

If you would like to roll with Reifenrath on her 25-mile journey from Emerson to Dakota City or donate money, reach out to her at the Emerson Public Library

The title of the article? “Local libraries are struggling to stay relevant in the age of technology.”

So to actually finish on a brighter note: DUCKLINGS!