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Category: A Précis of Librarianship

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 11-26-2017

It’s been a long time, so let’s have an update!

Jump to:
Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Copyright Corner

Emerging Technobabble

Research Reports

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Net Neutrality is a big topic this week so I’ll avoid repetition. Here’s one take on Net Neutrality as a press freedom issue.

With the educational materials bill in Florida already eyeing libraries, this new “controversial theories” bill is important to know about.

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

The title is too good to pass up: “Rogues and Rebels: Less than legal platforms for open access resources

Nature takes a look at plugins that facilitate open access.

Copyright Corner

Copyright is standing in the way of sharing information and scientific progress. Despite the Internet being created to share information between researchers, it is still hidden behind paywalls in the traditional publishing model.

Sci-Hub remains resilient despite losing domain names.

Copyright exemptions for libraries are common, but not consistent.

Emerging Technobabble

Paper: The use of social media by university library staff to facilitate undergraduate students

Research Reports

Paper: Satisfaction in virtual teams

Paper: What collaboration means to me

Paper: Standardizing citation instruction across the curriculum

 

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 9-24-2017

It’s been a while, so let’s get right into it.

Jump to:
Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)
Scholarly (Mis)Communication
Copyright Corner
Emerging Technobabble
Research Reports
Get your professional development on!
”Why do we even have libraries?”
New Sources
Ending on a Good Note

 

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

ALA responds to DACA end.

Changes to Section 108 may be in the works, but don’t get worked up yet.

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Article: Scholarly Communication as a Core Competency for librarians

Copyright Corner

Could Sci-Hub, LibGen, et al. be our new partners? Probably not but it’s a nice thought.

EFF roundup: Copyright Office needs to let us tinker; and the fight against DRM standard in the W3C continues.  

“We Shall Overcome” copyright. “This Land” might actually be “Your Land”.

Let’s Plays in danger due to stringent copyright enforcement via DACA.

“Open” Access in terms of negative and positive liberty. I don’t agree with the conceptualization of positive liberty exactly, I think it’s a little weakly defined, but still a neat way to think about something we deal with every day.

Article: Using Fair Use to preserve government data.

Emerging Technobabble

How is education actually transforming education? (If you need access, just let me know).

With my upcoming chapter on web archiving in the works, I’m doing a lot of reading on link rot.

Also just as a warning: turn your bluetooth off when not using it (unless you have an iPhone, which never fully turns bluetooth off as of iOS 11).

Research Reports

Article: “Should Institutions License their Data about Scholarship?” If you’re familair with Betteridge’s Law of Headlines, I think this applies to subtitles of journal issue briefs. Even the author doesn’t seem convinced one way or the other.

Get your professional development on!

This week is Banned Book Week! Here’s a webinar for some programming ideas.

”Why do we even have libraries?”

Preserving protests and their digital records.

English Language Learners and the contextualization provided by graphic novels.

New Sources

Alexander Hamilton papers online, thanks to the LoC.

Also the LoC has launched labs.loc.gov as a data source.

Ending on a Good Note

Little Free Libraries are in the news. Doing the good work.

Jer Thorpe at the LoC wins “coolest job title ever” in librarianship.

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 9-3-2017

Again, I have to thank Audrey Watters of Hack Education for the inspiration of this blogging format, with her weekly wrap up of education technology news.

Jump to:

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)
Scholarly (Mis)Communication
Copyright Corner
Emerging Technobabble
Research Reports
Get your professional development on!
”Why do we even have libraries?”
Ending on a Good Note

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

With the Net Neutrality debate in full swing, librarians should be well aware that access to high-speed internet is a basic utility required for their users to be integrated into the modern social, political, and economic systems we’ve built upon that utility. Yet Title II remains contentious, mainly due to monopolistic or duopolistic laws across the country that protect cable companies from competition.

Alaska adds its name to the list of fights for high-speed access, along with another fight against discrimination (protected by Title II) in Cleveland, Ohio, leading to a formal complaint against AT&T for slowed speeds in poorer neighborhoods. Comcast has also sued Vermont to prevent the construction of new high-speed Internet lines.

Meanwhile, AT&T has claimed that most of the comments the FTC has received that are “legitimate” are in favor of a repeal of net neutrality. This despite the fact that there are significantly more unique comments against the repeal of Title II.

As much as I dislike the FDLP, it does provide an important service in creating open government (kinda). Here’s a petition to protect title 44: https://freegovinfo.info/node/12325

There’s also a piece from the Washington Monthly that worries about the decline of the public research institution. The majority of research still happens in publicly funded universities… I just wonder how long that will remain the case. Maybe we’ll all be corporate librarians soon.

Also: stop locking laws away behind paywalls!

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Article: “Academic stratospheres-cum-underworlds: when highs and lows of publication cultures meet”. A critique of predatory publishing mixed with the geopolitics and economics of globalizing knowledge production.

Where we’re going, we won’t need (pay)walls. The importance of self-archiving when dealing with a long publishing process.

Copyright Corner

We’ve had one recurring theme during the short time I’ve been writing these précis: schools, universities, libraries, etc. should be focusing on protecting copyright. Here’s an argument as to why universities cannot perform that role. Lots of spying concerns there.

Techdirt uses the success of the revived NES and other classic Nintendo games as proof that when markets provide something people want, piracy goes down. It can’t just be about wanting “free stuff” (by the way, I would add that a VPN is not cheap…).

In my most recent webinar on copyright, I mentioned there’s something akin to a “10 second rule” for ContentID (a Google anti-piracy product that runs automated takedowns on YouTube). Apparently, there’s also a “seven second rule” that journalism students are taught. The thing is though, neither actually exist in law.

Grim copyright news out of Europe.

Emerging Technobabble

Google is in the news, as usual. This time for apparently putting pressure on think tank The New America Foundation to fire one of its members of their Open Markets group for pointing out Google’s growing monopoly. More on why that’s worrying. Here’s a quote from an email in the Times’ piece:

“We are in the process of trying to expand our relationship with Google on some absolutely key points,” Ms. Slaughter wrote in an email to Mr. Lynn, urging him to “just THINK about how you are imperiling funding for others.”

Google should be a major concern for librarians, since its growing influence will shape information technology and information science for a long time. Plus, as a provider, it has the power to shape services in ways that create systems that favor its vision of the future. What do we do when caught between Big Content’s copyright wars and Big Tech? Of course, it isn’t that simple.

Cathy O’Neil shows who (finally) is taking notice of our algorithmic overlords, and doing something about it.

The library as an education system.

Research Reports

Podcast: Learn a little more about the threats institutions face from hackers.

Paper: Notes on Operations Diminishing Short Term Loans. Looks more maturely at what Demand/Patron Driven Acquisitions has been doing (or not doing) for librarie).

Poster: Reference rot, a digital preservation issue beyond file formats.

Get your professional development on!

In addition to the podcast above, this presentation was a nice discussion on privacy online and the concerns your users may face, with lots of questions submitted by yours truly.

Some fun professional development in coding with students.

I’m not sure if this might instead fit into “Emerging Technobabble of Lore”, but it’s a very nice reflective on 10 years in librarianship.

Call for Papers: Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times (The Educational Forum)

”Why do we even have libraries?”

Library privatization in California continues, despite public outcry.

Ending on a Good Note

Students are spending less on textbooks/course materials.

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 8-30-2017

It has been one heck of a week.

Jump to:

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Copyright Corner

Emerging Technobabble

Research Reports

Get your professional development on!

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Following the events in Charlottesville, there’s a lot to talk about:

After Charlottesville, more campuses brace for neo-Nazi and alt-right protests. Which also leads into a discussion on how white supremacists have become the face of free speech debates on campus. The right to advocate for the extermination of groups of people is still a high priority for public universities (apparently “incitement” is no longer an issue).

The SPLC has created a “What Students Need to Know” guide about the alt-right. There is also the Charlottesville syllabus.

R. David Lankes’s piece “On Racism, Ignorance, and Librarianship.” I disagree with the way Lankes uses  the term “political party”, as if the struggles of people targeted by white supremacy are not politics-proper, but some sort of special interest. White supremacists have clearly chosen their favored party, and anti-fascists have realized when those ties have been cause for protest. However, despite finding this type of liberal non-racism distasteful, I am glad that Lankes did use his platform to reinforce the fact that librarians are not neutral. I would simply add that as librarians, as human beings, and for me and Lankes, as white people, we have a commitment to anti-racism, which will inevitably require the use of party politics, ideology, economics, public policy, and other areas that white people tend to claim as the neutral territory that their particular problems inhabit.

Copyright Corner

Songwriters push for the inclusion of authors’ moral rights into US copyright law. Because it has worked out so well in the few places we already have it (VARA).

Speaking of a troubling combination of moral rights, statues, and VARA, guess how copyright is getting in on the Confederate statue debate?

An education law pushes copyright enforcement as part of the responsibilities of teachers. I have a suggestion for an awareness program in the comments.

Farmers are hackers (pharmers?). I can’t wait for the dystopian movie with the 80s soundtrack.

Will the AI overthrow of humanity come down to intellectual property rights?

Emerging Technobabble

AT&T loses its attempt to enforce its state-backed monopoly against Google Fiber development in Louisville. Don’t worry AT&T, you still have your hands in the pockets of most state legislatures.

Research Reports

Article: What do data librarians think of their MLIS education?

Get your professional development on!

Article: Social media as a cost-effective way to promote library services.

 

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 8-13-2017

Another fascinating week!

Jump to:
Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)
Scholarly (Mis)Communication
Copyright Corner
Emerging Technobabble
Research Reports
Get your professional development on!

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Advocating as a librarian isn’t easy or simple. Here’s a little advice.

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Two studies suggest there’s trouble ahead for academic publishing (this link summarizes a lot of the issues also mentioned here, so a good place to start if you’re short on time!).

Elsevier acquires bepress, attempting to create an all-in-one scholarly ecosystem that it can provide to research institutions.

And still the system staggers on, broken and hypocritical.

Still, at least the Resistance is still going strong, with Sci-Hub having nearly all academic reserach within its grasp (and no signs of slowing).

Copyright Corner

Here’s some hopeful writing on OA tools, but don’t expect too much. See the emerging technologies section below for more on OA tools, there are some really good ones coming of age!

Cooking and copyright reform. A culinary gathering at “USQ Springfield and USQ Ipswich to celebrate the success of the Cooking for Copyright campaign, which led to national copyright reforms.”

Emerging Technobabble

What role does research provide in EdTech decision-making? (Hint: it’s not as rational as we would hope).

The Internet Archive is partnering with public libraries to decentralize the net and promote Web archiving!

As promised, here’s a slideshow that came into my Google Scholar alerts that has a lot of new OA tools I’ve never heard of, but are very exciting!

Research Reports

What gets kids to enjoy reading?

What’s the deal with Problem-Based Learning, and should we be so quick to employ it?

Get your professional development on!

CFP for articles on new literacies.

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 6-4-2017

I was hoping on doing one a week, but yet again I’m on a bi-weekly schedule.

Again, I have to thank Audrey Watters of Hack Education for the inspiration of this blogging format, with her weekly wrap up of education technology news.

Jump to:
Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Copyright Corner

Datafication Station

Emerging Technobabble

Research Reports

Get your professional development on!

New Sources

Ending on a Good Note

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Rhetoric and the cold war politics of information science. Nuff said. It’s behind a paywall in ASIS&T and doesn’t seem to have an OA version archived. I’m an ASIS&T member. Dunno why I mention that. Also the contact form is to the right. Dunno why I mention that either.

The Association of American Publishers is being reasonable, apparently. Good for them! So proud. *Trips over the bar that has been set for them*

I made it this far without mentioning the FCC, but… “People who were impersonated by anti-net neutrality spammers blast FCC”.

Podcast fans! The future of Internet copyright is among us! Rejoyce!

My favorite satirical magazine came up with yet another gem: To Reduce Terrorism, Repeal Network Neutrality. Seriously, I don’t know how they can parody clueless assholes so well.

Interesting development out of the 11th circuit: obtain a copyright registration before initiating litigation.

Also, calls on the Continent for the European Parliament to make progressive copyright changes. Will Europe become the copyright leader after being the force for more restrictions?

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Sigh. Just…. sigh. I’m not going to get myself worked up.

Open Peer Review! It’s a thing!

Copyright Corner

Apparently still unaware of the existence of the Streisand Effect, copyright monopolist Elsevier is taking Sci-Hub and LibGen to court again. Though they won the takedown of the Sci-Hub domain two years ago, the site persevered and remained open. This time, Elbakyan (the creator of Sci-Hub) notes that any attempt to shut down the domain will ultimately be futile, since it also resides on a TOR onion site.

Does Fair Use Affect Academic Authors’ Incentive to Write? I’ll give you a hint.

Ever wonder what a Copyright Librarian actually does? It’s pretty important!

This very thoughtful piece on UConn’s decision to not renew its Adobe CC license, and what this means for the values of the university, the students, and one professor’s attempts to navigate the realm of copyright in conversations with their students and peers.

On the arts and copyright, a Japanese music collection society wants private schools to pay up (lousy greedy kids).

Datafication Station

Algorithmic governance. I for one…. you know the joke.

Emerging Technobabble

AI and newsrooms. What could go wrong.

I think someone at the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies had an existential crisis: Don’t worry about opaque algorithms; you already don’t know what anything is doing, or why.

What kind of of Information Literacy are we teaching anyway?

Research Reports

I’ve been thinking about:

Scholarly communication in a non-academic sense. Even for librarians.

Open Access, Linked Open Data, and library collections. Also link rot and data protection.

Adult learners and information/search literacy using real-life examples. Also the new ACRL report on how librarians contribute to student success.

I’ve got a copyright webinar I’m giving, and The End of Ownership was useful in thinking of how to connect some dots for the listener.

And of course, cool tools that help organize the chaos of my life.

Get your professional development on!

Webinar: Empower students as creators

Webinar: Move into library middle management

New Sources

The Humanities Commons.

Humanities Commons is a trusted, nonprofit network where humanities scholars can create a professional profile, discuss common interests, develop new publications, and share their work. The Humanities Commons network is open to anyone.

Open Source Survey

Ending on a Good Note

Today we get to end on a really good note: Diego Gomez has been cleared of criminal charges for the heinous crime of sharing a master’s thesis.

 

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 5-21-2017

I’ve decided to go to a bi-weekly schedule to keep from putting too much pressure on myself.

Again, I have to thank Audrey Watters of Hack Education for the inspiration of this blogging format, with her weekly wrap up of education technology news.

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Speaking of interesting ad campaigns, Freedom of the Press Foundation did a targeted ad campaign of their SecureDrop system to potential whistleblowers in the Trump Administration.

Publishers Weekly has joined the list of people who noticed that librarianship is political. At least this time HR 1695 makes an appearance.

Librarians are starting to finally pay attention to HR 1695.

The FCC is in a pensive mood, as a rush of comments about Net Neutrality led it to take down its comments so it can “reflect”.

A dire lack of library access in schools was trending news in Scotland. A defense of public libraries in Northern Ireland also blipped on my radar. I’m not as familiar with the state of librarianship in the UK, but it’s something I would love to hear more about in the comments.

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Lots here on science publishing. Jon Tennant of Green Tea and Velociraptors gets two features: a guide for researchers looking to get started at ScienceOpen, and another on why we don’t need journal blacklists (particularly ones we have to pay for from publishers, for obvious reasons).

“Steady, strong growth” of OA in the sciences is expected, but so is their relationship to the traditional publishing model. What’s up with that?

But that’s not stopping Nature from profiting from shoddy science (and the retraction papers). Maybe we need to be focusing more on Open Peer Review, as well as Open Access.

“Do ResearchGate Scores create ghost academic reputations?” Social mediafication of academic reputations?! You mean academics are sometimes rated on their popularity, or other inflated prestige indicators, not the sheer quality of their research? Color me shocked.

Copyright Corner

One of the scant updates on Diego Gomez I’ve been able to find, the grad student who is facing jail time for sharing a MA thesis in Colombia. The reason this barbaric level of punishment exists? Why, it’s just the American way. And we’re not going to stop helping other countries create these laws any time soon.

Not only is it possible to copyright the law now, it’s apparently also not fair use to use footage of government proceedings. In cases like this, context is often key.

Whatever happened to digital first sale cases anyway?

Patent troll Blackbird “Tech” (apparently an abstract term representing the idea of technology, not the actual production of it) gets an earful after filing a lawsuit against Cloudflare.

Datafication Station

There was a fascinating speech put out on “The Quantified Worker,” by Ifeoma Ajunwa, and the move away from Taylorism and towards a mastery of the body of the worker: like Wellness Programs creating healthy workers that increase productivity. Similarly, what does the datafication of everything mean for justice and society? As librarians, we are often information scientists, and migrate into a data scientist role. Unlike data scientists, we have a longer tradition of emphasizing the “soft” skills and rights of users, and we should make sure to be heard in that discussion (I have an upcoming chapter on this I’ll link to once the publishing agreement is finished).

That is, if you still have a job.

Emerging Technobabble

Ex Libris is pushing its products towards BIBFRAME. Just as the LoC is upping its efforts. Maybe it’ll be in production by the time other linked-data initiatives steal all the thunder, like Wikipedia and the Wikipedia Library.

Disruption is a term I’m already getting sick of, as it’s almost never about the technology itself.

Personal digital archiving is something I think about often. I wonder what digital archives will look like in 50 years.

Research Reports

I’ve added a neat feature from the Internet Archive I wasn’t aware of, which is a 404 page handler that will attempt to send a person to the archived version of the page they were looking for. Hope some of my site breaks so I can try it out!

I also presented at the Florida Library Association’s annual conference last week, and the Technical Services Member Group’s website now has our slides.

I’m playing around with using Facebook to promote scholarly websites. I don’t know how many people expect to see an Open Access Resources list as a sponsored ad on Facebook, but hopefully they’ll like it.

Get your professional development on!

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/philosophy-of-technology (Starts May 29)

And the Technical Services Member Group also updated our list of training resources on demand.

New Sources

The LoC released 25 million MARC records to the public.

Ending on a Good Note

Although this is ending on a good note, it should also be a section on “how to bury the lede”. Here’s the good note:

LaVaille Reifenrath has also decided to do an independent campaign to raise money for the library. As an independent project and fundraiser, the library director will make a special journey in her wheelchair to raise money for the Emerson Public Library.

“I chose on my 50th birthday, June 11th, to wheel from here to Dakota City and to collect money to do some updates to the library,” said LaVaille Reifenrath, Director, Emerson Public Library.

If you would like to roll with Reifenrath on her 25-mile journey from Emerson to Dakota City or donate money, reach out to her at the Emerson Public Library

The title of the article? “Local libraries are struggling to stay relevant in the age of technology.”

So to actually finish on a brighter note: DUCKLINGS!

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 5-7-2017

This is going to be my inaugural post in what I’m tentatively calling A Little Précis of Librarianship (taking the risk of putting a pun in a title, and in a written format). I have to thank Audrey Watters of Hack Education for the inspiration, with her weekly wrap up of education technology news. I wanted something like that for librarianship, and, finding nothing, thought maybe I should make one. Expect the format to change, but I’ve tried to give some semblance of order.

Jump to:

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)
Scholarly (Mis)Communication
Copyright Corner
Datafication Station
Emerging Technobabble
Research Reports
Get your professional development on!
New Sources
Ending on a Good Note

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Hold on to your hats, nerds, because I’ve been fuming about HR 1695, the “Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act of 2017” for weeks now. This act will remove the Office from the Library of Congress (and thus away from Dr. Hayden’s pick to replace the previous Register of Copyright and newly-minted head of the Association of American Publishers, Maria Pallante). Pallante being forced out caused a certain amount of outcry from the usual suspects, until it was revealed the Copyright Office mismanaged several million dollars and lied to Congress about it.

As expected, the bill sailed through the House of Representatives. What was surprising was the total lack of coverage I saw about it, despite setting up an array of Google Alerts to catch any news. The ALA finally managed to squeeze out a single bullet-point on the bill’s passage in American Libraries on May 3rd.

Of course, copyright monopolists  cheered and urged Congress to act even faster (presumably because it’s so very pressing an issue, which is always why legislation should be passed as quickly as possible, right?).

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

This doesn’t really count as a scholarly communication issue, but it sure seems like it should: turns out there’s no cheap-and-cheerful replacement for a college degree yet (now just tell our administrators that and we’ll be set).

Copyright Corner

Due to HR 1695, I had to move a lot of articles into the Politics section, but there were still plenty of other stories over the past week.

For example, Australia’s copyright agency kept $11 million in funds that were intended for authors of “orphaned works”, collected from schools and universities, to lobby against adopting an American-style of fair use (by those very schools and universities). This was apparently after the office had previously been criticized for simply distributing the money to its member groups, rather than returning it to the schools and universities.

World Intellectual Property Day was April 26th. There was some excellent recommended reading, which I suspect will be my new tradition each year I remember that the holiday exists.  

A response to WIPD was given by a group of civil societies in the Americas urging copyright reform. In the public’s favor!

A subreddit story with lots of good discussion: a homeowner whose house burned down is now in a copyright fight with the builder, because the builder cannot handle the rebuild. When the homeowner contracted someone else to do the rebuild, they received a cease-and-desist letter. Whether or not any resolution will get posted, it’s certainly interesting to read the comments from lawyers chiming in.

Hackers who acquired some episodes of the upcoming season of Orange is the New Black tried to extort Netflix into paying them to not leak the material. Netflix decided not to, and one episode was leaked (much like the trope of mailing a kidnapping victims finger or something). After much hemming and hawing on the part of the hackers to get some payment, they released the ten episodes of the new season they had. And… nothing happened. Turns out people pay for Netflix for more than just one show’s season.

Bots do a lot of copyright takedown requests these days. It’s fun having to explain that to people who know copyright well enough that they are aware of Fair Use, and then watch their reaction to the fact that website owners don’t care what your rights are, they just don’t wanna be sued. Anyway, looks like Facebook will have to close forever now. Won’t it be nice once the Copyright Office is ready to fight for the regular folks and has a small claims court set up? You can get all kinds of threatening letters then!

Datafication Station

Forbes, my favorite satirical magazine, has a hilarious advice piece directed at CEOs who are worried that automation and data-driven decision making will take their jobs: be charismatic!

Emerging Technobabble

Jimmy Wales announced the upcoming launch of Wikitribune, a mixture of professional journalists and socially-generated peer review, with a crowd-funded revenue model.

Unpaywall, the addon that attempts to let a reader know when an open access version of a paywalled article exists, hinted on Twitter about an upcoming partnership with the OA Button’s author request system. One super-addon in the works?

Audrey Watters of the aforementioned Hack Education blog blocked annotation tools like hypothes.is and Genius on her site. Doug Belshaw had a thoughtful piece about his own process in coming to agree with Watters, expanding on why it can be important to prevent what we might call “digital graffiti” from piggybacking on an author’s hard work. It also made me rethink my earlier position on the Internet Archive deciding it would ignore robots.txt files and archive pages anyway.

Why AI is not like biological intelligence.

Research Reports

I’m looking into discovery systems and open access, so I started a YouTube playlist on the topic to listen to while I mindlessly play games. Maybe I’ll try building my own one day, once the whole OA indexing thing gets a little more settled (apparently indexes are trade secrets of Google’s now).

I made a Quizlet set of Spanish terms for librarians.

On other people’s research: the Carnegie Trust in the UK was criticized for an “over-optimistic” report on the outlook for libraries.

Get your professional development on!

Write for LibUX! They’re specifically looking for entry level writings.

But don’t become too well developed: you’ll be distrusted.

New Sources

Some of the FBI’s “Sex Deviates” program files have been attained by a professor of history at Penn State via FOIA requests, digitized and published online for researchers to use.

Slightly dated now, but the open government project pursued by Steve Ballmer, USAFacts, is worth reading up on. I’m looking forward to using it with students and professors.

Ending on a Good Note

I’ve never had much reason to think about the Authors’ Alliance, but they hosted one of the few full-article, critical examinations of HR 1695. It was so good (or perhaps the only glimmer in the darkness), that I wanted to excerpt one bit here:

H.R. 1695 finds support among industry insiders who are nervous that Hayden, who has made a career as a public librarian, would appoint as Pallante’s successor someone whose positions on copyright issues might be more closely aligned with the interests of libraries and the public than with interests of those who commercially exploit copyrights and who have long had considerable influence on the Office’s policy prescriptions.