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Category: Uncategorized

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 9-24-2017

It’s been a while, so let’s get right into it.

Jump to:
Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)
Scholarly (Mis)Communication
Copyright Corner
Emerging Technobabble
Research Reports
Get your professional development on!
”Why do we even have libraries?”
New Sources
Ending on a Good Note

 

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

ALA responds to DACA end.

Changes to Section 108 may be in the works, but don’t get worked up yet.

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Article: Scholarly Communication as a Core Competency for librarians

Copyright Corner

Could Sci-Hub, LibGen, et al. be our new partners? Probably not but it’s a nice thought.

EFF roundup: Copyright Office needs to let us tinker; and the fight against DRM standard in the W3C continues.  

“We Shall Overcome” copyright. “This Land” might actually be “Your Land”.

Let’s Plays in danger due to stringent copyright enforcement via DACA.

“Open” Access in terms of negative and positive liberty. I don’t agree with the conceptualization of positive liberty exactly, I think it’s a little weakly defined, but still a neat way to think about something we deal with every day.

Article: Using Fair Use to preserve government data.

Emerging Technobabble

How is education actually transforming education? (If you need access, just let me know).

With my upcoming chapter on web archiving in the works, I’m doing a lot of reading on link rot.

Also just as a warning: turn your bluetooth off when not using it (unless you have an iPhone, which never fully turns bluetooth off as of iOS 11).

Research Reports

Article: “Should Institutions License their Data about Scholarship?” If you’re familair with Betteridge’s Law of Headlines, I think this applies to subtitles of journal issue briefs. Even the author doesn’t seem convinced one way or the other.

Get your professional development on!

This week is Banned Book Week! Here’s a webinar for some programming ideas.

”Why do we even have libraries?”

Preserving protests and their digital records.

English Language Learners and the contextualization provided by graphic novels.

New Sources

Alexander Hamilton papers online, thanks to the LoC.

Also the LoC has launched labs.loc.gov as a data source.

Ending on a Good Note

Little Free Libraries are in the news. Doing the good work.

Jer Thorpe at the LoC wins “coolest job title ever” in librarianship.

The William Davidson Talmud

Just added to the Humanities Open Access Resources page:

The William Davidson Talmud is a free digital edition of the Babylonian Talmud with parallel translations, interlinked to major commentaries, biblical citations, Midrash, Halakhah, and an ever-growing library of Jewish texts. As with all of Sefaria, The William Davidson Talmud will continually evolve as we add additional translations, commentaries, and connections.

You can submit your own favorite OA Humanities resources here.

A Little Précis of Librarianship, 7-30-2017

It’s been a while since my last post, with a lot going on at work and such. But there’s always more to talk about, so let’s get going!

Jump to:
Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Copyright Corner

Emerging Technobabble

Research Reports

Get your professional development on!

Politics (the one that there’s nothing funny about)

A little late on the reporting, but the House Appropriation Committee was very miffed about the House Judiciary Committee stealing their thunder with the Copyright Office “reform” bill.

Scholarly (Mis)Communication

Paper: “Pressing Forward in Scholarly Communities:Synthesizing Communication Technologies with the Researchers Who Utilize Them”
Does Open Access work for circumventing paywalls? What will the crossover period look like? Will OA keep growing?
More on scholarly communication below.

Copyright Corner

More on Sci-Hub and Elsevier’s lawsuit against it.
Also, how exactly does Sci-Hub do what it does? Have publishers been hacked?
Also a very interesting discussion at a Scholarly Communication conference on Sci-hub and other academic piracy as a symptom.
The W3C and the Encrypted Media Extensions (DRM extensions) HTML standard: EFF’s response highlights librarian voices (an encouraging trend and a good argument for librarians to accept their role in this conversation).

Emerging Technobabble

Surprisingly, for a satire paper, Forbes has a thoughtful take on the need for web preservation.
Has the joy of learning gone out of online education?

Research Reports

Paper: Avoiding information overload.

Get your professional development on!

My colleague also finished her webinar on gamification for the South Carolina Library Association, so please do check out the recording!

Upcoming Webinar on Copyright, 6-21 at 2pm Eastern.

June 21, 2017 Emerging Issues in Copyright: A Jaunt Through Some Common Problems 2:00-3:00pm EST Justin M. White

Hodges University

Register for webinar here This webinar will take a stroll through some issues in copyright that show there is a serious need to rethink how we conceptualize copyright, authors’ rights, and fair use. There are no easy solutions, but it’s important to understand the questions. Issues will include: remixing, reusing, fair use, piracy, non-legal rule-making (from digital content platforms), encryption and copying, and the economic and cultural effects of near-costless copying. It will touch on how various economies intersect, such as the prestige economy of academic publishing vs. the economics of plenty. Obscure journals no longer need Elsevier to stay afloat, they only need institutional support, a website, and a good sitemap that can be indexed by Google. Optionally, these journals can also publish in platforms like Scholar Commons (bepress), and again have their metadata immediately indexed by Google Scholar. Open Educational Resources and the textbook industry will come up, along with the non-academic topics of artistic creation in platforms that are constantly policed by our copyright laws. The primary purpose of the webinar will be to give librarians some food for thought: a few cautionary tales from the world of copyright, and perhaps a few ideas to act upon. Recommended for anyone who enjoyed the book The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future (2016).

You can find more webinars and a call for webinar presenters here: http://www.nclaonline.org/college-university 

Collier County FL and the new battles over textbooks

The Florida Citizens for Science have been doing a great job tracking this legislative battle:

Fresh off their success in the Florida legislature where their instructional materials bill passed, the Florida Citizens’ Alliance is now causing migraine headaches on their home turf: Group sues Collier County schools over textbook selection

The session concerning public objections to the textbooks up for approval by the school board was archived here: http://www.collierschools.com/site/Default.aspx?PageID=10655

The News-Press reports that five books were approved and one was rejected. 

Here’s a preview of the kinds of objections raised:

Joseph Doyle, a Collier County resident who doesn’t have children in the school system, agreed with the parental objections and said one of the books, “Understanding Economics,” “bent to socialism and social justice warriors trying to indoctrinate our children.”

You can find the list of objections here: http://floridacitizensalliance.com/liberty/instructional-materials-review-index/

This is just the first in a series of fights that will take place in school districts all across Florida due to the passage of HB 989.

It’s also important to note that another law was passed that isn’t often mentioned, a “religious freedom” bill that will be used in tandem with the instructional materials bill to challenge science and history in the classroom. This is the  explicit position of the Florida Citizen’s Alliance on the bills:

Flaugh said his group will use it in conjunction with the instructional materials bill to contest textbooks that demonstrate “bias toward Islam and seldom mention Christianity,” and promote those that push for a Christian view of the origins of life.

The Florida Citizens’ Alliance seem to be taking cues from the fight in Texas over textbooks, citing Texas Truth in Textbooks in their website.

Librarians will need to be ready and willing to provide supplemental materials for teachers that can support curriculum goals when books have been challenged and removed, but classes will be expected to go on. EDIT: I have also been informed that the bill allows all instructional materials to be challenged, including supplemental materials that librarians might help curate.

Supporting your library (or other charity) with Amazon Smile

I’ve been aware of the Amazon Smile program for a while now, but I always forget to go into smile.amazon.com to make my purchases count towards my chosen charity (the Friends of the Fort Myers Library). I just got a reminder to make sure to go to the right version of Amazon, and thought “there has to be an addon to remind me of this”. Amazon itself advises you to use Amazon Assistant, which is an incredibly annoying addon. Instead, there’s SmileAlways, which is just an addon for Chrome that redirects you every time you type in Amazon. Simple!